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Health and Lifestyle

Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), a member of the grass family, is a major cereal grain grown in temperate climates globally. It was one of the first cultivated grains, particularly in Eurasia as early as 10,000 years ago. Barley has been used as animal fodder, as a source of fermentable material for beer and certain distilled beverages, and as a component of various health foods. It is used in soups and stews, and in barley bread of various cultures. Barley grains are commonly made into malt in a traditional and ancient method of preparation.

In 2014, barley was ranked fourth among grains in quantity produced (144 million tonnes) behind corn, rice and wheat

Barley was one of the first domesticated grains in the Fertile Crescent, an area of relatively abundant water in Western Asia, and near the Nile river of northeast Africa. The grain appeared in the same time as einkorn and emmer wheat. Wild barley (H. vulgare ssp. spontaneum) ranges from North Africa and Crete in the west, to Tibet in the east. The earliest evidence of wild barley in an archaeological context comes from the Epipaleolithic at Ohalo II at the southern end of the Sea of Galilee. The remains were dated to about 8500 BCE. The earliest domesticated barley occurs at aceramic (“pre-pottery”) Neolithic sites, in the Near East such as the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B layers of Tell Abu Hureyra, in Syria. By 4200 BCE domesticated barley occurs as far as in Eastern Finland. Barley has been grown in the Korean Peninsula since the Early Mumun Pottery Period (circa 1500–850 BCE) along with other crops such as millet, wheat, and legumes.

Barley (known as Yava in both Vedic and Classical Sanskrit) is mentioned many times in Rigveda and other Indian scriptures as one of the principal grains in ancient India. Traces of Barley cultivation have also been found in post-Neolithic Bronze Age Harappan civilization 5700–3300 years before present.

In the Pulitzer Prize-winning book Guns, Germs, and Steel, Jared Diamond proposed that the availability of barley, along with other domesticable crops and animals, in southwestern Eurasia significantly contributed to the broad historical patterns that human history has followed over approximately the last 13,000 years; i.e., why Eurasian civilizations, as a whole, have survived and conquered others.

Barley beer was probably one of the first alcoholic drinks developed by Neolithic humans. Barley later on was used as currency. Alongside emmer wheat, barley was a staple cereal of ancient Egypt, where it was used to make bread and beer. The general name for barley is jt (hypothetically pronounced “eat”); šma (hypothetically pronounced “SHE-ma”) refers to Upper Egyptian barley and is a symbol of Upper Egypt. The Sumerian term is akiti. According to Deuteronomy 8:8, barley is one of the “Seven Species” of crops that characterize the fertility of the Promised Land of Canaan, and it has a prominent role in the Israelite sacrifices described in the Pentateuch (see e.g. Numbers 5:15). A religious importance extended into the Middle Ages in Europe, and saw barley’s use in justice, via alphitomancy and the corsned.

Rations of barley for workers appear in Linear B tablets in Mycenaean contexts at Knossos and at Micenaean Pylos. In mainland Greece, the ritual significance of barley possibly dates back to the earliest stages of the Eleusinian Mysteries. The preparatory kykeon or mixed drink of the initiates, prepared from barley and herbs, referred in the Homeric hymn to Demeter, whose name some scholars believe meant “Barley-mother”. The practice was to dry the barley groats and roast them before preparing the porridge, according to Pliny the Elder’s Natural History (xviii.72). This produces malt that soon ferments and becomes slightly alcoholic.

Pliny also noted barley was a special food of gladiators known as hordearii, “barley-eaters”. However, by Roman times, he added that wheat had replaced barley as a staple.

Tibetan barley has been a staple food in Tibetan cuisine since the fifth century CE. This grain, along with a cool climate that permitted storage, produced a civilization that was able to raise great armies.[34] It is made into a flour product called tsampa that is still a staple in Tibet. The flour is roasted and mixed with butter and butter tea to form a stiff dough that is eaten in small balls.

In medieval Europe, bread made from barley and rye was peasant food, while wheat products were consumed by the upper classes. Potatoes largely replaced barley in Eastern Europe in the 19th century.

Natural and Organic Lifestyle

Organic foods are foods produced by methods that comply with the standards of organic farming. Standards vary worldwide; however, organic farming in general, features practices that strive to foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. Organizations regulating organic products may choose to restrict the use of certain pesticides and fertilizers in farming. In general, organic foods are also usually not processed using irradiation, industrial solvents or synthetic food additives.

Healthy Diet

A healthy diet is one that helps to maintain or improve overall health.

A healthy diet provides the body with essential nutrition: fluid, adequate essential amino acids from protein, essential fatty acids, vitamins, minerals, and adequate calories. The requirements for a healthy diet can be met from a variety of plant-based and animal-based foods. A healthy diet supports energy needs and provides for human nutrition without exposure to toxicity or excessive weight gain from consuming excessive amounts. Where lack of calories is not an issue, a properly balanced diet (in addition to exercise) is also thought to be important for lowering health risks, such as obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cancer.

Various nutrition guides are published by medical and governmental institutions to educate the public on what they should be eating to promote health. Nutrition facts labels are also mandatory in some countries to allow consumers to choose between foods based on the components relevant to health.

The idea of dietary therapy (using dietary choices to maintain health and improve poor health) is quite old and thus has both modern scientific forms (medical nutrition therapy) and prescientific forms (such as dietary therapy in traditional Chinese medicine).

Healthy Recommendation

The World Health Organization (WHO) makes the following 5 recommendations with respect to both populations and individuals:

  • Eat roughly the same amount of calories that your body is using and maintain a healthy weight.

  • Limit intake of fats, and prefer unsaturated fats to saturated fats and trans fats.

  • Increase consumption of plant foods, particularly fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains and nuts.

  • Limit the intake of sugar. A 2003 report recommends less than 10% of calorie intake from simple sugars.

  • Limit salt / sodium consumption from all sources and ensure that salt is iodized.

Other recommendations include:

  • Essential micronutrients such as vitamins and certain minerals.

  • Avoiding directly poisonous (e.g. heavy metals) and carcinogenic (e.g. benzene) substances.

  • Avoiding foods contaminated by human pathogens (e.g. E. coli, tapeworm eggs).

  • WHO recommends an intake of less than 5 grams of salt per day for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

The Human Nutrition

Human nutrition refers to the provision of essential nutrients necessary to support human life and health. Generally, people can survive up to 40 days without food, a period largely depending on the amount of water consumed, stored body fat, muscle mass and genetic factors.

Poor nutrition is a chronic problem often linked to poverty, poor nutrition understanding and practices, and deficient sanitation and food security. Malnutrition and its consequences are immense contributors to deaths and disabilities worldwide. Promoting good nutrition helps children grow, promotes human development and eradication of poverty.

Pure Certified Organic Barley : The Advantages of Sante Pure Barley

Certified Organic Barley
Not every farm that claims to be organic is organic.

Sante provides only organic barley from farms certified by BioGro NZ, New Zealand’s leading organic certification agency. BioGro is accredited by the International Federation of Organic Agriculture MOvements (IFOAM) which represents the best in international organic standards.

The BioGro certificate assures us that there are no unsafe levels of heavy metal, herbicide, and insecticide residues. NZ farms cannot be “certified organic” if unsafe residues are found. The farm must undergo residue testing as part of its certification.

Guaranteed Young Barley Leaves
The young leaves of organic barley are harvested only once, when they are below 30cm in height. Only the barley tops, where nutrients are concentrated, are harvested. No second or third harvest of young barley leaves are in any of Sante Pure Barley products.

Guaranteed Pure
Every Sante Barley Pure New Zealand 500mg Capsule contains pure barley, without any additives or artificial color.

Guaranteed Fresh
Freshly harvested barley is immediately transported to the manufacturing plant for dying, milling, and packing. It takes only 1 -6 hours between harvest and drying of fresh barley leaves using a patented process that assures preservation of vitamins, minerals. enzymes, and amino acids.

Vegetable Capsules
Sante Barley Pure is packed in vegetable capsules. It is safe for vegetarians and vegans.

Sante Barley Pure is packed in blister strips of 10 capsules each for handy and convenient use, anywhere and anytime.

The Health Benefits of the Pure Certified Organic Barley

Powerful antioxidant Contains soluble and insoluble fiber for weight management Lowers blood pressure Reduces risk of heart disease Powerful detoxifier Lowers cholesterol level Reduces the risk of cancer – fights cancer Great source of vitamins, minerals and amino acids

Rich in chlorophyll (improves oxygenation, with anti mutagenic and anti-cancer properties, repairs damage to cells and tissue)